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Posts Tagged ‘Web 3.0’

Coders Of The Future Will Not Be Engineers

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

When most people who read my blog see the word engineer they immediately think of those who write code for a living. In other words, computer programmers who may or may not have actual degrees in computer engineering. This is the definition of engineer that you should be thinking of in the title to this post.

Two-years ago this Saturday, Peter Thiel made a still-controversial announcement that kids are better off dropping out of college — or not going in the first place — and instead starting a company. To help motivate his quarry, and entice (grab) young talent twenty-years old and younger, Thiel offers a two-year mentorship and $100k. However, the thumbing of a college education may be a short-lived trend. Why? Because the next version of hacker will not be the computer whiz kid who is touted as the up and coming coding guru.* The next celebrated hackers will not be able to safely learn how to cut complex code in their bedroom. Read more »

Fracturing The Stream

Saturday, April 14th, 2012

I just read an interesting article on the BBC’s website (in their Science & Environment section) and was surprised to see this little social gem at the end of the article:

Do you think Quentin has got it right? If you would like to comment on this story, head over to our Facebook page or message us on Twitter.

Explorers examine a crevasse on Lyman Glacier in 1916. (Photo courtesy of the United States Forest Service. Archived at the World Data Center for Glaciology, Boulder, CO.)

The BBC has apparently outsourced the commenting functions on its site to Facebook and Twitter. Of course, Twitter is not truly a commenting service as there is no way to follow a threaded conversation.

I do not know how long the BBC has relied on an outside site to host and hold conversations about their articles. I believe that BBC’s decision — or any site’s — to fracture their content stream by choice is a bad idea.

Why? Because it makes users have to leave their site — why would they want that — and log into another site just to read and post comments about an article. As some of us do not have Facebook accounts by choice (like me), it also means that they are alienating some people from the conversation. Read more »

The Emerging Global Brain and the Internet’s Future

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

A few interesting posts and seemingly-unrelated themes have been circulating around Google Plus for the past few weeks or so. These thoughts have, I believe, been spurred on by the impending threat of the insanity of the SOPA and PIPA legislation.

I see the issues of Internet censorship, access rights, and content reuse as part of a much larger phenomenon that many people are unaware. Whereas the Internet has been a revolutionary force in humanity’s communication capabilities, facilitating numerous societal, cultural, political, and economic changes, I believe that it is the emerging evolutionary changes fueled by the accelerating growth in technology that will bring about the most radical and fundamental transformation.

Let me lead you through my thinking. Read more »

Making the Stream More Intelligent

Saturday, December 17th, 2011

We’ve all heard the term CMS — Content Management System. These systems broadly fall into the blog platform category although they can often be more than simple blogging engines. WordPress and Drupal are the two most famous open-source CMSs.

The current Web has moved past the point where personal blogging is a big focus into the realm of real-time (RT) social interaction. Most content is now generated and shared via RT social networks than on CMS-based systems. However, unlike a CMS’s focus on content, the RT social networks’ focus is on users and their Streams. Read more »

Building the Social Web: the Layers of the Smartup Stack

Wednesday, August 24th, 2011

<Smartups Series Part 5 of 5>

As a Social Web architect and an open source advocate I frequently write, think, and promote the notion and ideals of the Open and Social Web. My work in the areas of user-centric control (identity, privacy, data portability, and rights), federated Social Web models, future-of-money projects, and W3C standards groups has shaped my views presented here.

Soon after publishing my 4-part smartup series (almost a year ago), I began to think about key parts of what has become this article. I’ve had bits and pieces of this article jotted down in various places. Over the past three months, the ideas have coalesced into a cohesive framework. With a recent and lengthy process of helping a potential smartup try to find its foundation, I’ve been motivated to assemble, clarify, and share my views on what I call the layers of the smartup stack. Read more »

How to Get Me Involved in Your Smartup

Monday, August 15th, 2011

I receive six to eight requests for help from startups each year—from angel investing, to advising, to consulting, to joining as a founder. To date, I’ve never accepted a single offer. Recently, however, I was very intrigued by one startup’s vision, so much so that I spent a significant amount of time exploring that opportunity. In the end, it did not work out. A few of the reasons why this opportunity did not pan out will be encapsulated in my below set of guidelines.

Below you will find what I call my 7-by-7 rules. Whereas this is my current set of criteria, I believe this list is useable by anyone seeking to attract talent or looking to start a smartup. Please feel free to adopt, modifying, or expand upon this list and use it as you see fit. Read more »

Cybernetics, the Social Web, and the (Coming?) Singularity

Wednesday, July 20th, 2011

Image Credit: Sekko Da Vinci (see link below)

Over the past year or so, I have been doing a lot of thinking, reading, and ruminating about several topics: the outdated thinking of Web-2.0 startups, the need for a revolution in the microblogging space , what identity in the Social Web is really all about, and the meaning of a truly user-centric Social Web. As I’ve been furiously writing about these topics, in the back of my mind, I’ve been wondering where all of these advancements may eventually lead.

Whereas you will find my insights and thoughts about the Social Semantic Web strewn throughout my website, this article is an attempt to extrapolate a few of those ideas in a more provocative and profound–if not frightening–way. So, you have be forewarned. Any resemblance to reality may be greatly over exaggerated!

Read more »

Is Surrogate Blogging via Google Plus a Good Idea?

Saturday, July 9th, 2011

I recently came across this discussion on Google Plus (G+) about Kevin Rose’s decision to stop using his personal blog in preference to G+. He is now redirecting all visitors to his blog to his G+ profile. Within G+, well-known tech leaders such as Bill Gross and Paul Allen (not of Microsoft fame) have both indicated that they are seriously considering doing the same thing.

What does this mean for blogging? Is this a bad portent for blogs? Is it wise to use a surrogate platform owned and controlled by a third party for your content creation and sharing platform? Read more »

Subverting the Open Web: Schema.org’s Scheme to Control Structured Data

Wednesday, June 15th, 2011

When the initial news about Schema.org hit the Twitterverse two weeks ago, a few people asked for my opinion. Being the responsive, diligent, social-media maven that I am–who has close to zero free nanoseconds–I took a pathetically-cursory look at Google’s announcement and at the Schema.org website and quickly tweeted back this less-than-thoughtful response. Read more »

The HyperWeb: it’s All About Connections

Friday, January 7th, 2011

I recently came across this interesting graphic entitled Hierarchy of Visual Information. The author clearly states that it is a work in progress, just the genesis of an idea, a not-fully-formed thought. In fact, he rightly points out that this–in general–is not a new concept at all and provides a link to a Google image search result showing many incarnations of the data-information-knowledge-wisdom concept.

As I looked at his graphic, a different idea came to mind, a different interpretation of the concept in the context of the Web’s evolution. The hierarchical nature of the illustration made me think of the increasing complexity that comes with increasing connectivity. Read more »

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