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Posts Tagged ‘SocialWeb’

How to Get Me Involved in Your Smartup

Monday, August 15th, 2011

I receive six to eight requests for help from startups each year—from angel investing, to advising, to consulting, to joining as a founder. To date, I’ve never accepted a single offer. Recently, however, I was very intrigued by one startup’s vision, so much so that I spent a significant amount of time exploring that opportunity. In the end, it did not work out. A few of the reasons why this opportunity did not pan out will be encapsulated in my below set of guidelines.

Below you will find what I call my 7-by-7 rules. Whereas this is my current set of criteria, I believe this list is useable by anyone seeking to attract talent or looking to start a smartup. Please feel free to adopt, modifying, or expand upon this list and use it as you see fit. Read more »

Subverting the Open Web: Schema.org’s Scheme to Control Structured Data

Wednesday, June 15th, 2011

When the initial news about Schema.org hit the Twitterverse two weeks ago, a few people asked for my opinion. Being the responsive, diligent, social-media maven that I am–who has close to zero free nanoseconds–I took a pathetically-cursory look at Google’s announcement and at the Schema.org website and quickly tweeted back this less-than-thoughtful response. Read more »

Who Should Own the Internet?

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

This image is a tracing of all the Internet traffic circa late 2006. It is licensed under a Creative Commons License (by-nc-sa/1.0) and created by http://opte.org/

The genesis for this article came from reading this interesting piece by @novaspivack about his honored invitation to participate in the e-G8 Forum—a gathering of global Internet leaders to be held right before this year’s G8 Summit in Paris. Nova asked his readers what they thought were the key issues to communicate.

As I began to compose a response to Nova’s query, it soon became clear that I had too much to say for a blog comment and decided that it was more fitting to write an article for my own site and then simply point Nova to it. Read more »

How Many Streams Can You Kayak At Once?

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

About a year ago I started to feel the peer pressure of the Stream universe. I wrote about the issue of yet-another-stream phenomenon (YASP), stating that:

YASP…is that somewhat exciting but ultimately frustrating realization that there is yet another social networking, microblogging, curated, real-time, threaded-conversation service that you might have to join so that you don’t get left behind.

In essence, every week we are bombarded with the newest, hottest, social networking startup that is touted as being the next big thing. A number of us rush to sign up, hoping to get in on the closed beta. Read more »

It’s Time for Blogging to Evolve

Saturday, March 5th, 2011

The concept of blogging needs to evolve. Whereas Twitter and Facebook seem to have stolen some of the wind from blogging, I believe that netizens in general still desire to control their webspace and their webpresence. That is one reason that Diaspora–the upstart distributed social networking project–found initial funding success on Kickstarter. People want to have control over their content and privacy. They want to use their personal website as the anchor, as the foundation for their online communications. Read more »

The HyperWeb: it’s All About Connections

Friday, January 7th, 2011

I recently came across this interesting graphic entitled Hierarchy of Visual Information. The author clearly states that it is a work in progress, just the genesis of an idea, a not-fully-formed thought. In fact, he rightly points out that this–in general–is not a new concept at all and provides a link to a Google image search result showing many incarnations of the data-information-knowledge-wisdom concept.

As I looked at his graphic, a different idea came to mind, a different interpretation of the concept in the context of the Web’s evolution. The hierarchical nature of the illustration made me think of the increasing complexity that comes with increasing connectivity. Read more »

The Web is Not (yet) Social

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

There is a common misunderstanding about the meaning of the phrase Social Web. I believe that most of the Web’s netizens think that the Web is social. But in fact the Web is not currently social.

Whereas Facebook, Twitter, FourSquare, and other ventures are social platforms, they are not the Web. These entities are only part of the Web—although it’s looking more and more “like” Facebook wants you to think that the Web equals Facebook. Read more »

I’ve Got a Clot in My Klout: Influence Across a Distributed Social Web.

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

I’ve been a fan of Klout since its inception. I was a relatively early adopter of its services and believer in its ideal to become the standard for influence measurement. I still use Klout and believe in their vision. Why else would I place a Klout widget on my About Me page?

But there are two issues that I wish to address. Read more »

Flowing Your Identity Through the Social Web

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

Some social networking platforms are beginning to buy into data portability. Whereas any step toward opening up the closed data-silo islands is a positive step, the real question is what does data portability actually mean?

Data portability is defined as the ability to “bring your identity, friends, conversations, files and histories with you, without having to manually add them to each new service.”

Does this really solve the most important issue that users face when spelunking the depths of the social networking space? Read more »

BuddyPress Privacy Component About to Launch

Saturday, October 23rd, 2010

Here’s a brief update on my efforts to provide a suite of privacy filtering services to BuddyPress’ core components. With the release of BP v1.2.6, the last of the essential ingredients are now in place to allow my Privacy Component to function. On November 8, 2010, I plan to make the component available to all via the WordPress Plugin Repository. You can learn more on BP-Privacy.com.

To celebrate this occasion, I am offering two specials: 40% off of the standard BuddyPress Privacy Component Support Plan (BPCSP) and the other 25% discount on advertising rates. All but two of the first month’s ad spots are sold. So, if you want to get in early and lock in these prerelease rates, act now.

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