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Posts Tagged ‘privacy 2.0’

Building the Social Web: the Layers of the Smartup Stack

Wednesday, August 24th, 2011

<Smartups Series Part 5 of 5>

As a Social Web architect and an open source advocate I frequently write, think, and promote the notion and ideals of the Open and Social Web. My work in the areas of user-centric control (identity, privacy, data portability, and rights), federated Social Web models, future-of-money projects, and W3C standards groups has shaped my views presented here.

Soon after publishing my 4-part smartup series (almost a year ago), I began to think about key parts of what has become this article. I’ve had bits and pieces of this article jotted down in various places. Over the past three months, the ideas have coalesced into a cohesive framework. With a recent and lengthy process of helping a potential smartup try to find its foundation, I’ve been motivated to assemble, clarify, and share my views on what I call the layers of the smartup stack. Read more »

Who Should Own the Internet?

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

This image is a tracing of all the Internet traffic circa late 2006. It is licensed under a Creative Commons License (by-nc-sa/1.0) and created by http://opte.org/

The genesis for this article came from reading this interesting piece by @novaspivack about his honored invitation to participate in the e-G8 Forum—a gathering of global Internet leaders to be held right before this year’s G8 Summit in Paris. Nova asked his readers what they thought were the key issues to communicate.

As I began to compose a response to Nova’s query, it soon became clear that I had too much to say for a blog comment and decided that it was more fitting to write an article for my own site and then simply point Nova to it. Read more »

The Web is Not (yet) Social

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

There is a common misunderstanding about the meaning of the phrase Social Web. I believe that most of the Web’s netizens think that the Web is social. But in fact the Web is not currently social.

Whereas Facebook, Twitter, FourSquare, and other ventures are social platforms, they are not the Web. These entities are only part of the Web—although it’s looking more and more “like” Facebook wants you to think that the Web equals Facebook. Read more »

Thinking Outside the Privacy Box

Monday, June 7th, 2010

When it comes to issues of privacy and identity, the Web continues to experience growing pains. People speak of privacy and identity management as if they were separate issues. I believe that managing your personal identity is tantamount to managing your privacy. In effect, what is termed Privacy 2.0 and Identity 2.0 are really one and the same thing. Read more »

Repackaging the Promise of the Social Semantic Web

Saturday, May 15th, 2010

I recently read Robert Scoble’s blog post, Privacy Reboot Needed. He makes a compelling case for the possible benefits accrued to each Web citizen that volunteers to expose their entire activity stream–across their various social networks–for all to see. Read more »

Regaining Control of Privacy and Identity: It’s up to Each Individual

Sunday, May 2nd, 2010

This is a follow-up post to my article, Privacy in the Facebook Era. It was originally a reply to a comment by Chris Messina in that post. As this topic continues to be relevant, I’ve decided to extract my comment from that post, revise it, add to it, and turn it into an article. Read more »

A Flock of Twitters: Decentralized Semantic Microblogging

Wednesday, February 24th, 2010

In my last article, Flocking To the Stream, I ended with this thought about the growing issue of social-networking fatigue:

…as the number of streams continue to increase and as the flow rate of each stream picks up, people will grow tired of having to subscribe to, having to join yet-another-stream phenomenon (YASP). Does the Web truly need additional stream providers each with their own data silos? Is there a user-centric solution to this rapidly growing, overflowing-stream issue that puts YASP to rest once and for all?

This article answers these two questions in great detail but the succinct preview version is as follows: Read more »

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