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Posts Tagged ‘microblogging’

Fracturing The Stream

Saturday, April 14th, 2012

I just read an interesting article on the BBC’s website (in their Science & Environment section) and was surprised to see this little social gem at the end of the article:

Do you think Quentin has got it right? If you would like to comment on this story, head over to our Facebook page or message us on Twitter.

Explorers examine a crevasse on Lyman Glacier in 1916. (Photo courtesy of the United States Forest Service. Archived at the World Data Center for Glaciology, Boulder, CO.)

The BBC has apparently outsourced the commenting functions on its site to Facebook and Twitter. Of course, Twitter is not truly a commenting service as there is no way to follow a threaded conversation.

I do not know how long the BBC has relied on an outside site to host and hold conversations about their articles. I believe that BBC’s decision — or any site’s — to fracture their content stream by choice is a bad idea.

Why? Because it makes users have to leave their site — why would they want that — and log into another site just to read and post comments about an article. As some of us do not have Facebook accounts by choice (like me), it also means that they are alienating some people from the conversation. Read more »

Is Surrogate Blogging via Google Plus a Good Idea?

Saturday, July 9th, 2011

I recently came across this discussion on Google Plus (G+) about Kevin Rose’s decision to stop using his personal blog in preference to G+. He is now redirecting all visitors to his blog to his G+ profile. Within G+, well-known tech leaders such as Bill Gross and Paul Allen (not of Microsoft fame) have both indicated that they are seriously considering doing the same thing.

What does this mean for blogging? Is this a bad portent for blogs? Is it wise to use a surrogate platform owned and controlled by a third party for your content creation and sharing platform? Read more »

It’s Time for Blogging to Evolve

Saturday, March 5th, 2011

The concept of blogging needs to evolve. Whereas Twitter and Facebook seem to have stolen some of the wind from blogging, I believe that netizens in general still desire to control their webspace and their webpresence. That is one reason that Diaspora–the upstart distributed social networking project–found initial funding success on Kickstarter. People want to have control over their content and privacy. They want to use their personal website as the anchor, as the foundation for their online communications. Read more »

Apple’s Ping Versus the Social Web

Saturday, September 4th, 2010

In my last article, I wrote about the potential impact that Apple’s iTunes Ping, their just-released social network for music, might have on other social networks like Facebook and Twitter. The more important question is, What impact might Ping have on the Social Web? Read more »

Apple Unveils Ping and Enters Social-networking War with Facebook and Twitter

Wednesday, September 1st, 2010

During Apple’s media event today, CEO Steve Jobs previewed iTunes 10 which will include Ping, a social network for music (Ping press release). I believe this is possibly a game-changing event for Facebook, Twitter, and the Social Web in general. Read more »

Nosquare and Nowalla: Polluting the Stream

Saturday, March 13th, 2010

Location-based services are great. But please stop sending updates (check ins) to your Twitter and Facebook accounts. It is the perfect example of social-networking tie-in gone wrong.

Why do I say this? It’s simple. For those of us that are hundreds or thousands of miles away–which could be many of your followers–tweeting your current location provides zero value. Read more »

A Flock of Twitters: Decentralized Semantic Microblogging

Wednesday, February 24th, 2010

In my last article, Flocking To the Stream, I ended with this thought about the growing issue of social-networking fatigue:

…as the number of streams continue to increase and as the flow rate of each stream picks up, people will grow tired of having to subscribe to, having to join yet-another-stream phenomenon (YASP). Does the Web truly need additional stream providers each with their own data silos? Is there a user-centric solution to this rapidly growing, overflowing-stream issue that puts YASP to rest once and for all?

This article answers these two questions in great detail but the succinct preview version is as follows: Read more »

Flocking To the Stream

Wednesday, February 17th, 2010

I recently began to go through some article backlogs on the websites of various people whose thoughts and perspectives I want to understand better. One such person with whom I’m trying to play catch up is Nova Spivack. If you don’t follow Nova then I suggest taking the time to remedy that Read more »

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