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Posts Tagged ‘freedoms’

Software With Freedoms, Not Free Software

Friday, October 12th, 2012

I’ve been an open source advocate, devotee, user, and developer for many years. I’m a member of the Free Software Foundation (FSF). I frequently write about the Open Web, Social Web, and Open Source of all types (software, hardware, science, data, Web standards).

Much of my recent work has been licensed under the GPL. The GPL is administered and promulgated by the FSF. Apparently what is now considered the open source movement, actually was the result of a schism from the free software movement. In other words, open source was spawned out of the free software movement, not the other way around.

To some, there are philosophical differences between the two movements. They can best be summed up as follows: all free software is open source but not all open source software is free (although much of it is). You can learn more about the subtleties of this argument in this article on the GNU website, Why Open Source misses the point of Free Software. Read more »

The Emerging Global Brain and the Internet’s Future

Thursday, January 5th, 2012

A few interesting posts and seemingly-unrelated themes have been circulating around Google Plus for the past few weeks or so. These thoughts have, I believe, been spurred on by the impending threat of the insanity of the SOPA and PIPA legislation.

I see the issues of Internet censorship, access rights, and content reuse as part of a much larger phenomenon that many people are unaware. Whereas the Internet has been a revolutionary force in humanity’s communication capabilities, facilitating numerous societal, cultural, political, and economic changes, I believe that it is the emerging evolutionary changes fueled by the accelerating growth in technology that will bring about the most radical and fundamental transformation.

Let me lead you through my thinking. Read more »

Who Should Own the Internet?

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

This image is a tracing of all the Internet traffic circa late 2006. It is licensed under a Creative Commons License (by-nc-sa/1.0) and created by http://opte.org/

The genesis for this article came from reading this interesting piece by @novaspivack about his honored invitation to participate in the e-G8 Forum—a gathering of global Internet leaders to be held right before this year’s G8 Summit in Paris. Nova asked his readers what they thought were the key issues to communicate.

As I began to compose a response to Nova’s query, it soon became clear that I had too much to say for a blog comment and decided that it was more fitting to write an article for my own site and then simply point Nova to it. Read more »

BP Privacy: History and Lessons Learned from Developing a Major BuddyPress Component

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

Coding great-quality, open source software, while often rewarding, can also be a thankless, difficult task. As many have been asking for an update on BP Privacy–also known as the BuddyPress Privacy Component–I thought I would take the time to write up an exhaustive history of the project and share some lessons learned. Read more »

The Web is Not (yet) Social

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

There is a common misunderstanding about the meaning of the phrase Social Web. I believe that most of the Web’s netizens think that the Web is social. But in fact the Web is not currently social.

Whereas Facebook, Twitter, FourSquare, and other ventures are social platforms, they are not the Web. These entities are only part of the Web—although it’s looking more and more “like” Facebook wants you to think that the Web equals Facebook. Read more »

How the Death of Net Neutrality Effects You

Monday, August 16th, 2010

The potential impact of the Google-Verizon proposal to end wireless net neutrality on bloggers, niche social network owners, and ecommerce sites seems to be misunderstood or not even realized by many of my colleagues in the the Web design and development business Read more »

Google-Verizon Joint Statement Presages End to Net Neutrality

Monday, August 9th, 2010

If you design websites, run a small web-based business, make money from blogging, or are launching a startup, the level playing field of the Internet is about to get very bumpy. If you think that mobile-based services are the future and are catering to the wireless crowd, then be prepared for a game-changing shift. Read more »

Goodbye Google Old Friend: It’s time for the Open-Source Internet

Friday, August 6th, 2010

The issue of net neutrality has once again reared its ugly head, coming to a roiling boil with recent reports of Google entering a back-room deal with Verizon to end net neutrality. Read more »

Regaining Control of Privacy and Identity: It’s up to Each Individual

Sunday, May 2nd, 2010

This is a follow-up post to my article, Privacy in the Facebook Era. It was originally a reply to a comment by Chris Messina in that post. As this topic continues to be relevant, I’ve decided to extract my comment from that post, revise it, add to it, and turn it into an article. Read more »

Privacy in the Facebook Era

Monday, January 11th, 2010

Facebook’s founder Mark Zuckerberg recently stated that privacy is no longer a social norm. Is that an actual fact or a engineered fact?

Here’s why I ask. Over the past several years, whenever Facebook has made a change to its privacy policies, it has caused great uproar—not only with civil liberties advocates (as you would expect), but also with Facebook’s user base. Read more »

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