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Archive for the ‘Social Media & Semantic Web’ Category

The Web is Not (yet) Social

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011

There is a common misunderstanding about the meaning of the phrase Social Web. I believe that most of the Web’s netizens think that the Web is social. But in fact the Web is not currently social.

Whereas Facebook, Twitter, FourSquare, and other ventures are social platforms, they are not the Web. These entities are only part of the Web—although it’s looking more and more “like” Facebook wants you to think that the Web equals Facebook. Read more »

I’ve Got a Clot in My Klout: Influence Across a Distributed Social Web.

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

I’ve been a fan of Klout since its inception. I was a relatively early adopter of its services and believer in its ideal to become the standard for influence measurement. I still use Klout and believe in their vision. Why else would I place a Klout widget on my About Me page?

But there are two issues that I wish to address. Read more »

Flowing Your Identity Through the Social Web

Wednesday, December 1st, 2010

Some social networking platforms are beginning to buy into data portability. Whereas any step toward opening up the closed data-silo islands is a positive step, the real question is what does data portability actually mean?

Data portability is defined as the ability to “bring your identity, friends, conversations, files and histories with you, without having to manually add them to each new service.”

Does this really solve the most important issue that users face when spelunking the depths of the social networking space? Read more »

Release of BuddyPress Privacy Component Pushed Back One Week

Sunday, November 7th, 2010

Yes, I know. What??? How could you??!! And just on the greatly-anticipated eve of BP Privacy’s release? Is this a warped event caused by a rip in the space-time continuum or possibly even triggered by Daylight Savings Time? Is this some sort of a joke?

Nope. It is real. The reason is simple and practical. Read more »

BuddyPress Privacy Offers You the Power of the Force

Thursday, October 28th, 2010

Okay, that title may not be accurate. But for those advanced BuddyPress administrators and site owners who are performance focused, the BuddyPress Privacy Component will offer the option of creating the ACL (access control list) tables with the InnoDB storage engine instead of the MyISAM storage engine which WordPress and BuddyPress use as the default. This offers a number of advantages such as referential integrity with cascading deletes and updates and row-level locking instead of table-wide locking—which increases performance by facilitating multi-user concurrency, a crucial point for under-powered servers or highly-trafficked sites. Read more »

BuddyPress Privacy Component About to Launch

Saturday, October 23rd, 2010

Here’s a brief update on my efforts to provide a suite of privacy filtering services to BuddyPress’ core components. With the release of BP v1.2.6, the last of the essential ingredients are now in place to allow my Privacy Component to function. On November 8, 2010, I plan to make the component available to all via the WordPress Plugin Repository. You can learn more on BP-Privacy.com.

To celebrate this occasion, I am offering two specials: 40% off of the standard BuddyPress Privacy Component Support Plan (BPCSP) and the other 25% discount on advertising rates. All but two of the first month’s ad spots are sold. So, if you want to get in early and lock in these prerelease rates, act now.

Web 3.0 Smartups: the New Web Business Space

Tuesday, September 21st, 2010

<Smartups Series Part 4 of 5>

This is the fourth article in my five-part series about Powering Startups to Become Smartups. In part 1, we discussed why Web-2.0 startups were stuck in the box and how in-the-box thinking leads to missed opportunities. In part 2, we discussed the most salient aspect of Web 3.0, the Web of Data and the emergence of the Social Web. Read more »

Web 3.0 Smartups: Moving Beyond the Relational Database

Friday, September 17th, 2010

<Smartups Series Part 3 of 5>

Today’s Web-based services are dealing with substantially higher volumes of data. But the challenges of data storage and management in the Social Web go beyond the issue of increasing data volume. In Web 3.0, data are significantly more complex and difficult to define ahead of time.

Unfortunately, many existing Web-2.0 startups continue to use only a RDBMS (relational database management system) model for meeting all their data storage and management needs—and some of these startups are starting to see the problems with that decision. Read more »

Web 3.0 Smartups: the Social Web and the Web of Data

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

<Smartups Series Part 2 of 5>

In the first installment of my Web 3.0 series, Powering Startups to Become Smartups, I presented a general overview of the Web’s evolving paradigm. I made the argument that today’s Web-based startups needed to step outside the current Web-2.0 box and think like a Web-3.0 company. By leveraging the power of Web 3.0, a common-place startup could transform itself into a smartup.

In this second installment, I’m going to talk about what most people think of when they hear the term Web 3.0—the Semantic Web or Web of data. In the process, I hope to correct some common misconceptions about what the Semantic Web is and what it is not. Read more »

Web 3.0: Powering Startups to Become Smartups

Monday, September 13th, 2010

If you are a Web-based technology startup focused on the 2.0 version of the Web (a.k.a. Web 2.0), then you are not thinking outside of the box anymore. The Web is constantly evolving: innovating and implementing new technologies; adapting in a more timely manner to user feedback and needs; redefining the roles of business partners; and pushing the boundaries of what is possible.

This is the first article in my four-part series about powering startups to become smartups. You can find the timeline for future installments of my series at the end of this article. Read more »

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