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Archive for the ‘Social Media & Semantic Web’ Category

Cybernetics, the Social Web, and the (Coming?) Singularity

Wednesday, July 20th, 2011

Image Credit: Sekko Da Vinci (see link below)

Over the past year or so, I have been doing a lot of thinking, reading, and ruminating about several topics: the outdated thinking of Web-2.0 startups, the need for a revolution in the microblogging space , what identity in the Social Web is really all about, and the meaning of a truly user-centric Social Web. As I’ve been furiously writing about these topics, in the back of my mind, I’ve been wondering where all of these advancements may eventually lead.

Whereas you will find my insights and thoughts about the Social Semantic Web strewn throughout my website, this article is an attempt to extrapolate a few of those ideas in a more provocative and profound–if not frightening–way. So, you have be forewarned. Any resemblance to reality may be greatly over exaggerated!

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Is Surrogate Blogging via Google Plus a Good Idea?

Saturday, July 9th, 2011

I recently came across this discussion on Google Plus (G+) about Kevin Rose’s decision to stop using his personal blog in preference to G+. He is now redirecting all visitors to his blog to his G+ profile. Within G+, well-known tech leaders such as Bill Gross and Paul Allen (not of Microsoft fame) have both indicated that they are seriously considering doing the same thing.

What does this mean for blogging? Is this a bad portent for blogs? Is it wise to use a surrogate platform owned and controlled by a third party for your content creation and sharing platform? Read more »

Subverting the Open Web: Schema.org’s Scheme to Control Structured Data

Wednesday, June 15th, 2011

When the initial news about Schema.org hit the Twitterverse two weeks ago, a few people asked for my opinion. Being the responsive, diligent, social-media maven that I am–who has close to zero free nanoseconds–I took a pathetically-cursory look at Google’s announcement and at the Schema.org website and quickly tweeted back this less-than-thoughtful response. Read more »

Who Should Own the Internet?

Thursday, April 21st, 2011

This image is a tracing of all the Internet traffic circa late 2006. It is licensed under a Creative Commons License (by-nc-sa/1.0) and created by http://opte.org/

The genesis for this article came from reading this interesting piece by @novaspivack about his honored invitation to participate in the e-G8 Forum—a gathering of global Internet leaders to be held right before this year’s G8 Summit in Paris. Nova asked his readers what they thought were the key issues to communicate.

As I began to compose a response to Nova’s query, it soon became clear that I had too much to say for a blog comment and decided that it was more fitting to write an article for my own site and then simply point Nova to it. Read more »

How Many Streams Can You Kayak At Once?

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011

About a year ago I started to feel the peer pressure of the Stream universe. I wrote about the issue of yet-another-stream phenomenon (YASP), stating that:

YASP…is that somewhat exciting but ultimately frustrating realization that there is yet another social networking, microblogging, curated, real-time, threaded-conversation service that you might have to join so that you don’t get left behind.

In essence, every week we are bombarded with the newest, hottest, social networking startup that is touted as being the next big thing. A number of us rush to sign up, hoping to get in on the closed beta. Read more »

It’s Time for Blogging to Evolve

Saturday, March 5th, 2011

The concept of blogging needs to evolve. Whereas Twitter and Facebook seem to have stolen some of the wind from blogging, I believe that netizens in general still desire to control their webspace and their webpresence. That is one reason that Diaspora–the upstart distributed social networking project–found initial funding success on Kickstarter. People want to have control over their content and privacy. They want to use their personal website as the anchor, as the foundation for their online communications. Read more »

BP Privacy v1.0-RC1 is now available!

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

Please read Important Notice section below.

After more than 1500 hours of work, 7300 code and comment lines, and creation of a 38-page manual, BP Privacy release candidate one is now available for download and testing. It is a release candidate, not to be used in a production site. It requires at least PHP 5.2.x and is developed and tested to work with WordPress 3.0.5 and BuddyPress 1.2.7. It also requires a modern Web browser and you and your users must have javascript enabled. Read more »

BP Privacy: History and Lessons Learned from Developing a Major BuddyPress Component

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

Coding great-quality, open source software, while often rewarding, can also be a thankless, difficult task. As many have been asking for an update on BP Privacy–also known as the BuddyPress Privacy Component–I thought I would take the time to write up an exhaustive history of the project and share some lessons learned. Read more »

BP Privacy: An Update

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

This is an update on BP Privacy. I felt that it was important to communicate its current status. I also think that it is necessary to address a few who are claiming that BP Privacy is very late, for instance this statement that it is “at least 14 months late now“. Read more »

The HyperWeb: it’s All About Connections

Friday, January 7th, 2011

I recently came across this interesting graphic entitled Hierarchy of Visual Information. The author clearly states that it is a work in progress, just the genesis of an idea, a not-fully-formed thought. In fact, he rightly points out that this–in general–is not a new concept at all and provides a link to a Google image search result showing many incarnations of the data-information-knowledge-wisdom concept.

As I looked at his graphic, a different idea came to mind, a different interpretation of the concept in the context of the Web’s evolution. The hierarchical nature of the illustration made me think of the increasing complexity that comes with increasing connectivity. Read more »

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