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Are You “Ment” To Be A Great Leader?

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"Great leaders are evident by the subtle ways in which they interact with a company’s three human asset groups — employees, clients, and the public. Great leaders strip away the preconceived notions of management when engaging with these human asset groups."

ManagementWhat makes a great leader? Is it solid management acumen? Is it an aggressive drive? Is it the desire to win?

The sign of a great leader is often more nuanced than a set of applied, outwardly facing skills or a shared attitude. Not even impressive accolades and sterling credentials are signs of a great, or even good, leader.

Great leaders are evident by the subtle ways in which they interact with a company’s three human asset groups — employees, clients, and the public. Great leaders strip away the preconceived notions of management when engaging with these human asset groups.

How do they do this? By focusing solely on the “-ment” in management. Great leaders remove the blinders of discrimination. They strip the gender (the “man” in management) and age (the “age” in management) out of the equation.

Instead of biasing, or even thinking about, a person’s worth by considering their gender or age, they try to determine how to interact and communicate with a person based on the below “-ments”.

The Three “Ment” Categories Of Great Leaders

Great leaders utilize these “-ments” to assess others:

  • achievement
  • agreement
  • alignment
  • commitment
  • engagement
  • improvement
  • involvement

Great leaders leverage these “-ments” to make others successful:

  • acknowledgement
  • advancement
  • assessment
  • compliment
  • development
  • encouragement
  • enjoyment
  • enlightenment
  • equipment
  • excitement
  • experiment
  • fulfillment
  • investment
  • nourishment
  • readjustment
  • realignment
  • reinforcement

Great leaders do not practice, or are slow to apply, these “-ments”:

  • argument
  • bewilderment
  • commandment
  • debasement
  • denouncement
  • detachment
  • diminishment
  • disagreement
  • disappointment
  • discouragement
  • displacement
  • embarrassment
  • entitlement
  • entrapment
  • harassment
  • judgement
  • micromanagement
  • misstatement
  • mistreatment
  • nonengagement
  • noninvolvement
  • outplacement
  • punishment
  • resentment
  • underinvestment
  • underpayment

Great leaders focus on what others need and what others, and themselves, lack. They learn by listening to those around them. They do not judge until they have all the facts, and then they judge in a way that is not accusatory, condescending, or unproductive. Great leaders are focused on helping others win and in that process they win too.

If you wish to be a great leader, ignore the outward facade of people — their age, their gender, their sexual preference, their size, their style. Ignore all the obvious characteristics with which people are labeled, grouped, and judged. Focus, develop, and nurture the inward attributes of people and in doing so you will help them and you to both succeed.

Great leaders practice “-ment”!

Article Comments

  1. Enlightening- I know many in leadership roles that could greatly benefit from your advice-

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